Biochemical-Inspired Autonomous Control of Virtualized Network Functions

Ryota Kurokawa, Go Hasegawa, Masayuki Murata

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In Network Function Virtualization (NFV), various Virtual Network Functions (VNFs) are placed on general-purpose servers. To efficiently operate the NFV system, the placement of VNFs to servers, resource allocation to each VNF, and flow routes are determined carefully and adaptively to handle environmental fluctuations. Our research group has proposed a construction method of service space in virtualized network system, based on biochemical-inspired tuple space model. In this paper, we apply the method to an NFV system to adaptively configure and control VNFs in a distributed manner. We also describe the implementation design of the proposed method, based on the standardization activities to achieve Service Function Chaining. We finally present an application scenario of the proposed method to confirm the effectiveness of the implementation design of the proposed method.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication33rd International Conference on Information Networking, ICOIN 2019
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages387-392
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781538683507
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 May 17
Externally publishedYes
Event33rd International Conference on Information Networking, ICOIN 2019 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Duration: 2019 Jan 92019 Jan 11

Publication series

NameInternational Conference on Information Networking
Volume2019-January
ISSN (Print)1976-7684

Conference

Conference33rd International Conference on Information Networking, ICOIN 2019
CountryMalaysia
CityKuala Lumpur
Period19/1/919/1/11

Keywords

  • Network Function Virtualization
  • Network Service Header
  • Service Function Chaining
  • Software Defined Network
  • biochemical reactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems

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