Biocemical recycle of biodegradable plastics by an industrial fungus Aspergillus oryzae - Recruitment of esterases to the surface of plastics by novel fungal biosurfactants

Keietsu Abe, Toru Takahashi, Shinsaku Ohtaki, Katsuya Gomi, Fumihiko Hasegawa

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

In Japan, solid-phase fungal fermentation system using the industrial fungi Aspergillus oryzae have been extensively used for producing fermented foods such as sake and soy sauce; the annual production volume of the products is over one million ton per year. These efficient enzymatic hydrolyzing systems are expected to be applicable to biological recycling of biodegradable plastics. We found that A oryzae can degrade polybutylene succinate-coadipate (PBSA) by combinations with an esterase (cutinase) CutL1 and novel biosurfactants, RolA and HsbA that are attached to the surface of PBSA and then recruit CutL1 to the surface.

Original languageEnglish
Pages5668-5669
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Dec 1
Event55th Society of Polymer Science Japan Symposium on Macromolecules - Toyama, Japan
Duration: 2006 Sep 202006 Sep 22

Other

Other55th Society of Polymer Science Japan Symposium on Macromolecules
CountryJapan
CityToyama
Period06/9/2006/9/22

Keywords

  • Aspergillus oryzae
  • Biodegradable plastic
  • Biosurfactant
  • Esterase
  • Fungi
  • Recycle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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    Abe, K., Takahashi, T., Ohtaki, S., Gomi, K., & Hasegawa, F. (2006). Biocemical recycle of biodegradable plastics by an industrial fungus Aspergillus oryzae - Recruitment of esterases to the surface of plastics by novel fungal biosurfactants. 5668-5669. Paper presented at 55th Society of Polymer Science Japan Symposium on Macromolecules, Toyama, Japan.