Benefits of "smart ageing" interventions using cognitive training, brain training games, exercise, and nutrition intake for aged memory functions in healthy elderly people

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Memory functions decline with age. Many people are interested in methods of improving memory functions. To meet that need, we developed the concept of "smart ageing": a positive acceptance of the later stages in life. It characterizes ageing as a series of developmental stages of intellectual maturity. Based on the smart ageing concept, we introduce the beneficial effects of intervention programs incorporating cognitive training (working memory, episodic memory, and brain training games), exercise training (combination exercise), and nutrition (orange juice consumption) intervention in healthy elderly people. This chapter presents the following evidence. Cognitive training using working memory training and using "Brain Age" can improve working memory and short-term memory performance. Cognitive training using episodic memory training, exercise training using combination exercise, and nutrition intervention using flavonoid consumption can improve episodic memory performance. Finally, we discuss the future directions of intervention programs that can be used to improve memory functions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMemory in a Social Context
Subtitle of host publicationBrain, Mind, and Society
PublisherSpringer Japan
Pages269-280
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9784431565918
ISBN (Print)9784431565895
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec 15

Keywords

  • Brain training games
  • Cognitive improvement
  • Cognitive training
  • Exercise
  • Nutrition
  • Transfer effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

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