Autonomic nervous activity revealed by a new physiological index ρmax based on cross-correlation between mayer-wave components of blood pressure and heart rate

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The authors have proposed a new physiological index ρmax which is the maximum cross-correlation coefficient between blood pressure and heart rate whose frequency components are limited to the Mayer wave-band (0.04-0.15Hz). The advantages of this index are small individual difference and high reproducibility compared with other physiological indices which are calculated independently single cardiovascular measurements. The previous study showed that the index ρmax is possible to assess visually-induced motion sickness. However, the relation between the proposed index and autonomic nervous activity has not been clarified yet. In this study, the change in ρmax during sympathetic or parasympatlietic blockage has been investigated in comparison with conventional indices in an animal experiment. The results have indicated that ρmax does not have information on parasympathetic nerve activity but sympathetic one.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2006 SICE-ICASE International Joint Conference
Pages614-617
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Dec 1
Event2006 SICE-ICASE International Joint Conference - Busan, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 2006 Oct 182006 Oct 21

Publication series

Name2006 SICE-ICASE International Joint Conference

Other

Other2006 SICE-ICASE International Joint Conference
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityBusan
Period06/10/1806/10/21

Keywords

  • Autonomic nerve function
  • Blood pressure
  • Heart rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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