Association of poor dental status with eating alone: A cross-sectional Japan gerontological evaluation study among independent older adults

Anna Kinugawa, Taro Kusama, Takafumi Yamamoto, Sakura Kiuchi, Noriko Nakazawa, Katsunori Kondo, Ken Osaka, Jun Aida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Eating alone is reported to deteriorate health; however, the relationship between eating alone and poor dental health remains unclear. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the association between poor dental health and eating alone. Data of participants (n = 156,287) aged ≥65 years from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study were evaluated using logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between dental status, including prosthesis use, and eating status. Differences in these associations according to living status were also examined. The mean age of participants was 73.7 (SD = 6.0) years. The percentages of participants eating alone with 20 or more teeth, 10–19 teeth with dental prostheses, 0–9 teeth with dental prostheses, 10–19 teeth without dental prostheses, and 0–9 teeth without dental prostheses were 13.8%, 16.0%, 18.6%, 18.9%, and 27.0%, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, participants with 0–9 teeth without any dental prosthesis showed a significantly higher odds ratio for eating alone (OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.58–2.07) than those with 20 or more teeth. Among participants with poorer dental status, the probability of eating alone was higher in those living alone than in those living with others. Among older adults, poor dental status was significantly associated with eating alone, and this association was stronger among those living alone. Maintaining better dental status by using a dental prosthesis might reduce the risk of eating alone, especially for those living alone.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105732
JournalAppetite
Volume168
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jan 1

Keywords

  • Cross-sectional study
  • Dental status
  • Eating alone
  • Older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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