Association between improved adherence to the Japanese diet and incident functional disability in older people: The Ohsaki Cohort 2006 Study

Sanae Matsuyama, Shu Zhang, Yasutake Tomata, Saho Abe, Fumiya Tanji, Yumi Sugawara, Ichiro Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background & aims: Although it has been reported that the Japanese dietary pattern is associated with a lower risk of incident functional disability among older people, the potential benefits of improving adherence to the Japanese diet remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between 12-year change in adherence to the Japanese diet and the subsequent risk of incident functional disability in older people in Japan. Methods: We analyzed 10-year follow-up data from a cohort study of 2923 Japanese older adults (age ≥65 years) in 2006. We collected dietary information using a validated 39-item food frequency questionnaire at two time points (1994 and 2006). Adherence to the Japanese diet (high intake of rice, miso soup, seaweeds, pickles, green and yellow vegetables, fish, green tea; low intake of beef and pork, and coffee) was assessed using the Japanese Diet Index (JDI), which ranges from 0 to 9. Participants were categorized into five groups according to changes in the JDI score at these two time points. Data on incident functional disability from December 2006 to November 2016 were retrieved from the public long-term care insurance database. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident functional disability. Results: During 22,466 person-years of follow-up, 1093 cases of incident functional disability were documented. Compared with participants in the group with the largest decrease in the JDI score (≤−2), the multivariate-adjusted HR (95% CI) of incident functional disability was 0.77 (0.61–0.98) for those in the largest increase group (≥+2). Conclusions: Improved adherence to the Japanese diet was associated with a significantly lower risk of incident functional disability in older people in Japan.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

Keywords

  • Functional disability
  • Improving diet
  • Japanese diet
  • Prospective study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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