Association between cancer screening behavior and family history among Japanese women

Hiroko Matsubara, Kunihiko Hayashi, Tomotaka Sobue, Hideki Mizunuma, Shosuke Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine lifestyle habits and cancer screening behavior in relation to a family history of cancer among Japanese women. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted based on baseline data from the Japan Nurses' Health Study collected from June 2001 to March 2007. Participants were 47,347 female nurses aged 30-59. years residing in 47 prefectures in Japan. We compared lifestyle habits and the utilization of cancer screenings (cervical and breast) between women with and without a family history of the relevant cancer. Results: Although there were no differences in lifestyle habits with the exception of smoking status, women with a family history of uterine cancer were more likely to have undergone cervical cancer screenings (p. <. 0.01). Women with a family history of breast cancer were also more likely to have undergone breast cancer screenings regardless of their age (p. <. 0.01), but lifestyle behaviors did not differ. Among women with a family history of uterine cancer, those with a sister history were more likely to have undergone not only cervical (OR, 1.89; 95% CIs, 1.39-2.58), but also breast cancer screenings (OR, 1.54; 95% CIs 1.13-2.09). Conclusion: Having a family history of cancer was associated with cancer screening behavior, but not health promotive behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-298
Number of pages6
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 May

Keywords

  • Breast cancer screening
  • Cervical cancer screening
  • Family history of cancer
  • Health promotive lifestyle
  • Japanese women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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