Association between arthroscopic diagnosis of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis and synovial fluid nitric oxide levels

Tetsu Takahashi, Toshirou Kondoh, Maki Ohtani, Hidetaka Homma, Masayuki Fukuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between synovial fluid levels of nitric oxide and clinical and arthroscopic findings of synovitis or cartilaginous degeneration. Study design. Arthroscopic surgery was performed on 20 joints in 15 female patients with internal derangement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. Synovial fluid aspirates were obtained immediately before arthroscopy. Synovial fluid was also obtained from 14 joints of 11 female asymptomatic volunteers. The concentration of nitrite in the fluid recovered from each temporomandibular joint was measured through use of a highly sensitive and specific chemiluminescence detection method, calibrated per 1 mg of synovial fluid protein and expressed as nitric oxide; the result was then compared with clinical and arthroscopic findings of synovitis and cartilaginous degeneration. Results. Significantly higher levels of nitric oxide (median, 0.331 uμmol/mg) were seen in the patients with internal derangement and osteoarthritis than in the control group (median, 0.001 μmol/mg; P < .0001). Synovial fluid from joints with pain in the joint area had significantly higher levels of nitric oxide than did fluid from joints without such pain. Synovial fluid from joints with degenerative changes (median, 0.467 μmol/mg) had significantly higher levels of nitric oxide than did fluid from joints without osteoarthritis (median, 0.057 μmol/mg; P < .05). Although the levels of nitric oxide in synovial fluid aspirates were markedly elevated in some joints with synovitis, there was no correlation between the levels of nitric oxide and the presence of synovitis. Conclusions. The findings indicate that increased levels of nitric oxide are involved in the pathogenesis of cartilaginous degeneration of the temporomandibular joint.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-136
Number of pages8
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics
Volume88
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)

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