Assessment of cancer-related fatigue, pain, and quality of life in cancer patients at palliative care team referral: A multicenter observational study (JORTC PAL-09)

Satoru Iwase, Takashi Kawaguchi, Akihiro Tokoro, Kimito Yamada, Yoshiaki Kanai, Yoshinobu Matsuda, Yuko Kashiwaya, Kae Okuma, Shuji Inada, Keisuke Ariyoshi, Tempei Miyaji, Kanako Azuma, Hiroto Ishiki, Sakae Unezaki, Takuhiro Yamaguchi

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Abstract

Introduction Cancer-related fatigue greatly influences quality of life in cancer patients; however, no specific treatments have been established for cancer-related fatigue, and at present, no medication has been approved in Japan. Systematic research using patient-reported outcome to examine symptoms, particularly fatigue, has not been conducted in palliative care settings in Japan. The objective was to evaluate fatigue, pain, and quality of life in cancer patients at the point of intervention by palliative care teams. Materials and Methods Patients who were referred to palliative care teams at three institutions and met the inclusion criteria were invited to complete the Brief Fatigue Inventory, Brief Pain Inventory, and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire- Core 15-Palliative. Results Of 183 patients recruited, the majority (85.8%) were diagnosed with recurrence or metastasis. The largest group (42.6%) comprised lung cancer patients, of whom 67.2%had anEastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status of 0-1. The mean value for global health status/quality of life was 41.4, and the highest mean European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15-Palliative symptom item score was for pain (51.0). The mean global fatigue score was 4.1, and 9.8%, 30.6%, 38.7%, and 20.8%of patients' fatigue severity was classified as none (score 0), mild (1-3), moderate (4-6), and severe (7-10), respectively. Discussion Cancer-related fatigue, considered to occur more frequently in cancer patients, was successfully assessed using patient-reported outcomes with the Brief Fatigue Inventory for the first time in Japan. Results suggested that fatigue is potentially as problematic as pain, which is the main reason for palliative care.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0134022
JournalPloS one
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Aug 5

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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    Iwase, S., Kawaguchi, T., Tokoro, A., Yamada, K., Kanai, Y., Matsuda, Y., Kashiwaya, Y., Okuma, K., Inada, S., Ariyoshi, K., Miyaji, T., Azuma, K., Ishiki, H., Unezaki, S., & Yamaguchi, T. (2015). Assessment of cancer-related fatigue, pain, and quality of life in cancer patients at palliative care team referral: A multicenter observational study (JORTC PAL-09). PloS one, 10(8), [e0134022]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0134022