Application of a tri-axial accelerometry-based portable motion recorder for the quantitative assessment of hippotherapy in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

Tomoko Mutoh, Tatsushi Mutoh, Makoto Takada, Misato Doumura, Masayo Ihara, Yasuyuki Taki, Hirokazu Tsubone, Masahiro Ihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

[Purpose] This case series aims to evaluate the effects of hippotherapy on gait and balance ability of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy using quantitative parameters for physical activity. [Subjects and Methods] Three patients with gait disability as a sequela of cerebral palsy (one female and two males; age 5, 12, and 25 years old) were recruited. Participants received hippotherapy for 30 min once a week for 2 years. Gait parameters (step rate, step length, gait speed, mean acceleration, and horizontal/vertical displacement ratio) were measured using a portable motion recorder equipped with a tri-axial accelerometer attached to the waist before and after a 10-m walking test. [Results] There was a significant increase in step length between before and after a single hippotherapy session. Over the course of 2 year intervention, there was a significant increase in step rate, gait speed, step length, and mean acceleration and a significant improvement in horizontal/vertical displacement ratio. [Conclusion] The data suggest that quantitative parameters derived from a portable motion recorder can track both immediate and long-term changes in the walking ability of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy undergoing hippotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2970-2974
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Physical Therapy Science
Volume28
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Gait analysis
  • Hippotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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