Apatite-forming ability of carboxyl group-containing polymer gels in a simulated body fluid

M. Kawashita, M. Nakao, M. Minoda, H. M. Kim, T. Beppu, T. Miyamoto, T. Kokubo, T. Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

191 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carboxymethylated chitin, gellan gum, and curdlan gels were soaked in a simulated body fluid (SBF) having ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. Some of the gels had been soaked in a saturated Ca(OH)2 solution, while others had not. The carboxymethylated chitin and gellan gum gels have carboxyl groups, while the curdlan gel has hydroxyl groups. None of the gels formed apatite on their surfaces in the SBF when they had not been subjected to the Ca(OH)2 treatment, whereas the carboxymethylated chitin and gellan gum gels formed apatite on their surfaces when they had been subjected to the Ca(OH)2 treatment. The curdlan gel did not form an apatite deposit even after the Ca(OH)2 treatment. Apatite formation on the carboxymethylated chitin and gellan gum gels was attributed to the catalytic effect of their carboxyl groups for apatite nucleation, and acceleration of apatite nucleation from released Ca2+ ions. This result provides a guiding principle for obtaining apatite-organic polymer fiber composites. This composite is expected to have an analogous structure to that of natural bone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2477-2484
Number of pages8
JournalBiomaterials
Volume24
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jun
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Apatite
  • Biomimetic method
  • Carboxyl group
  • Composite
  • Polymer
  • Simulated body fluid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

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