Antibiotic susceptibility of the sputum pathogens and throat swab pathogens isolated from the patients undergoing treatment in twenty-one private clinics in Japan

A. Watanabe, K. Oizumi, K. Matsuno, T. Nishino, M. Motomiya, T. Nukiwa

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    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Bacteriology of the respiratory isolates from 2,539 patients with respiratory infections in 21 primary care clinics was documented. Of a total of 1,887 strains of potential pathogens recovered from 1,507 patients, 996 were gram-positive and 891 were gram-negative. Major pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. The MIC's against microbial isolates of six antimicrobial agents were determined. Ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were more active against S. aureus, Moraxella catarrhalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ampicillin and cefteram were more active against S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes than four other antimicrobials tested, respectively, in this experiment. New quinolones and new generation cephems were active against H. influenzae and Enterobacteriaceae. Only one strain of S. aureus was methicillin-resistant. As regards other pathogens, 6.5% of S. pneumoniae and 14.9% of H. influenzae were resistant to ampicillin, and 26.7% of H. influenzae were β-lactamase-positive. MRSA was found infrequently. But ampicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were found in primary care clinics almost as frequently as in intensive-medication-oriented clinics.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)235-247
    Number of pages13
    JournalTohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
    Volume175
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1995

    Keywords

    • MRSA
    • antibiotic susceptibility
    • primary care
    • respiratory pathogen

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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