Analysis of mechanisms by which NK cells acquire increased cytotoxicity against class I MHC-eliminated targets

Shunji Sugawara, Toru Abo, Hiroshi Itoh, Katsuo Kumagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acid treatment, where cells are exposed to 0.2 M citric acid buffer at pH 3 for 2 min, was described in a previous paper to be a method which specifically eliminates class I MHC antigens from the membrane of viable cells. We applied this method to characterize functional roles of class I MHC antigens on the target cells in NK cell cytotoxicity. When NK target cells, U937, Molt-4, and Raji, were subjected to acid treatment, the treated cells lost their surface class I MHC antigens and became more sensitive to NK cell killing. On the other hand, the susceptibility of K562 cells which initially lacked class I MHC antigens did not significantly change after such treatment. We then examined the mechanism which enables NK cells to become more cytotoxic against class I MHC antigen-eliminated target cells. Single cell binding assay and cold target inhibition assay demonstrated that class I MHC antigen-eliminated target cells did not acquire high binding affinity to NK cells. However, the interaction between NK cells and class I MHC antigen-eliminated targets resulted in a greater increase in production of NKCF-like factor than did the interaction between NK cells and untreated targets. Class I MHC antigen-eliminated targets did not acquire high killer susceptibility to NKCF-like factor. The present study utilizing the acid treatment method confirmed that surface class I MHC antigens on the targets are important immunoregulatory molecules not only for cytotoxic T lymphocytes but also for NK cells and elucidated some of the underlying mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-316
Number of pages13
JournalCellular Immunology
Volume119
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1989 Apr

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Analysis of mechanisms by which NK cells acquire increased cytotoxicity against class I MHC-eliminated targets'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this