Analysis of kinesiograph recordings and masticatory efficiency after treatment of non-reducing disk displacement of the temporomandibular joint

Shuichi Sato, F. Nasu, K. Motegi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to clarify the kinesiographs of chewing movement and masticatory efficiency before and after treatment in patients with non-reducing disk displacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Twenty patients who were diagnosed with unilateral non-reducing disk displacement of the TMJ were treated with pumping of the joint with injection of sodium hyaluronate. Chewing movement patterns in these patients were evaluated, using mandibular kinesiography (MKG) at their initial visit and at mean 19-month follow-up and the results were compared. Masticatory efficiency was also measured. As controls, 23 volunteers without TMJ dysfunction were employed. Far from the results of normal volunteers, chewing movement patterns of the patients on MKG did not show deviation to the chewing side in the TMJ-unaffected-side chewing in the horizontal plane. However, such patterns of the patients became similar to those of normal volunteers after treatment. Masticatory efficiency of the patients improved after treatment, though it was impaired at initial visit. The MKG and masticatory efficiency test appeared to be a useful method of comparing masticatory function before and after treatment in patients with non-reducing disk displacement of the TMJ.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)708-713
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of oral rehabilitation
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jul 1

Keywords

  • Mandibularkinesiograph
  • Masticatory efficiency
  • Non-reducing disk displacement of the TMJ
  • Pumping with injection of sodium hyaluronate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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