An Explanation of Microwave Effects by Expansion of Transit State Theories with Disturbed Velocity Distributions by Microwave

Motoyasu Sato, Jun Fukushima, Sadatsugu Takayama

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The microwave effects are examined experimentally and explained by expanding the Erying's transition state theories. Microwave couples with electro-kinetic waves in a material. The wave accumulates kinetic energy to the particles oscillating near the phase velocity via the Landau damping in a velocity space. It disturbs Boltzmann velocity distribution function. The pre-exponential factors are explained introducing the disturbed velocity distribution function to the Eyring transition state theories. It leads the enhancement of chemical reactions. If the microwave has monochromatic frequency, it can accumulate energy in phase space and make large disturbances in the velocity space. If it has frequency spread (δω), the phases of the excited waves interact each other and relax the kinetic energies to the thermal motions via the phase mixing before it disturbs the velocity function. Experimental results suggest that the microwave effect appeared or disappeared depending on the quality factor (ω/2δω) of microwave wave.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProcessing and Properties of Advanced Ceramics and Composites VI
Subtitle of host publicationCeramic Transactions
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages313-320
Number of pages8
Volume249
ISBN (Electronic)9781118995433
ISBN (Print)9781118995495
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Sep 15

Keywords

  • Boltzmann velocity distribution
  • Disturbed velocity distributions
  • Microwave effects
  • Monochromatic frequency
  • Transit state theories

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)

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