Administration of two oils rich in n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to rat pups of dams fed a diet high in fat and low in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

Fumiko Kimura, Yasushi Endo, Kenshiro Fujimoto, Nobushige Doisaki, Tsuyoshi Koriyama

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) with 20 or 22 carbons are considered important to the development of infants and sometimes added to infant formulae. In this study, two characteristic sources of n-3 LCPUFA (fish oil and microalgal oil) were orally administrated to rat pups of mildly n-3 PUFA - deficient dams to compare the consequences of the administration. The milk from the dams fed a n-3 PUFA - restricted diet contained less n-3 LCPUFA than that of the dams fed a control diet. Pups were administered 1 mg/g weight of the test oil at the age of 5-7 days. At the age of 7 days, they were sacrificed before or after the administration and fatty acid compositions of the stomach and serum lipid were studied. The administration changed docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) levels in the stomach contents and serum lipids with time. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) levels increased immediately after the administration of fish oil. The administration of microalgal oil also affected the serum lipid EPA level, in spite of a lack of EPA. In this study, both oils effectively supplemented DHA. Fish oil returned the serum EPA level close to the control value while microalgae oil had little effect.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)431-440
    Number of pages10
    JournalFisheries Science
    Volume71
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005 Apr 1

    Keywords

    • Administration
    • Fish oil
    • Infant
    • Microalgal oil
    • Milk

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Aquatic Science

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