A single low dose of eribulin regressed a highly aggressive triple-negative breast cancer in a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft model

Hye In Lim, Jun Yamamoto, Sachiko Inubushi, Hiroto Nishino, Yoshihiko Tashiro, Norihiko Sugisawa, Quinhong Han, Yu Sun, Hee Jun Choi, Seok Jin Nam, Moon Bo Kim, Ji Sun Lee, Chihiro Hozumi, Michael Bouvet, Shree Ram Singh, Robert M. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aim: In the present study, the breast cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model was used to identify an effective drug for a highly aggressive triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Materials and Methods: The TNBC tumor from a patient was implanted in the right 4th inguinal mammary fat pad of nude mice to establish a PDOX model. Three weeks later, 19 mice were randomized into the untreated-control group (n=10) and the eribulin treatment group (n=9, eribulin, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p., day 1). Results: On day 8, eribulin significantly inhibited tumor volume compared to the control group (p<0.01). Eribulin regressed tumors in 3 mice (33.3%) and apparently eradicated them in 6 mice (66.7%). At day 14, tumor regrowth was observed in 2 mice of the eribulin group, which was undetectable on day 8. However, 44.4% (4 out of 9) of the mice in the eribulin group were tumor-free on day 14. Conclusion: A single low-dose eribulin was efficacious on a highly aggressive TNBC. The breast cancer PDOX model can be used to identify highly effective drugs for TNBC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2481-2485
Number of pages5
JournalAnticancer research
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 May
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Eribulin
  • PDOX
  • PDX
  • Patient-derived orthotopic xenograft
  • Patient-derived xenograft
  • TNBC
  • Triple-negative breast cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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