A simulation model for coral reef formation: Reef topographies and growth patterns responding to relative sea-level histories

Takashi Nakamura, Toru Nakamori

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coral reef topographies and reef growth patterns are influenced from relative sea-level histories. Several types of reef growth patterns responding to the relative sea-level histories, e.g. balanced aggrading/onlapping, seaward prograding, back stepping, etc., have been identified in previous studies. Recently, Nakamura and Nakamori (Coral Reefs 2007, 26, 741-755) developed a geochemical model for coral reef formation based on diffusion-limited and light-enhanced calcification, and the model reconstructed well the reef topography and Holocene reef-growth history. In this paper, we modified the model, and simulated it on four scenarios of relative sea-level histories. The simulation result on the first scenario, which is similar with global sea level history between 8,000 years B.P. and present, is very similar with balanced aggrading/onlapping type of Holocene fringing reefs. The simulations on the scenarios of stable sea level and gradual sea level falling are well-reconstructed seaward prograding type reefs. The result of the simulation on the scenario of faster sea-level rising is similar with back-stepping type reefs. Therefore, the reef topographies and growth pattern responding to relative sea level histories simulated by the model were in general wellreconstructed concerning Holocene reefs observed in nature.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSea Level Rise, Coastal Engineering, Shorelines and Tides
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages251-261
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781617286551
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

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