A non-equilibrium dynamic wall-model for LES of high Reynolds number airfoil flow near stall condition

Soshi Kawai, Asada Kengo, Kozo Fujii

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Large-eddy simulation (LES) with non-equilibrium dynamic wall-model is applied to a subsonic flow over an airfoil near stall condition at high Reynolds number (chord based Rec = 2.1×106) to investigate the predictability of the wall-modeled LES for the transitional and separated flow. The wall model considered in this study is built based on the recent wall-model developments by Kawai and Larsson [Phys. Fluids 24 015105, 2012; and Phys. Fluids accepted (to appear), 2013] and is extended to the transitional and separated flow by introducing a transition treatment in the wall model. Comparisons between the non-equilibrium wall model and equilibrium model illustrate the importance of involving the non-equilibrium effects into the wall model. By incorporating the non-equilibrium effects, the wall-modeled LES yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of statistics and structures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition 2013
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Aug 19
Externally publishedYes
Event51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition 2013 - Grapevine, TX, United States
Duration: 2013 Jan 72013 Jan 10

Publication series

Name51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition 2013

Other

Other51st AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting including the New Horizons Forum and Aerospace Exposition 2013
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityGrapevine, TX
Period13/1/713/1/10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Aerospace Engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A non-equilibrium dynamic wall-model for LES of high Reynolds number airfoil flow near stall condition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this