A new approach for glomerular lesions: Evaluation of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) for experimental glomerular disease in rats

Hirofumi Hitomi, Hideyasu Kiyomoto, Mayuko Hashimoto, Yasuharu Aki, Koichi Uchida, Norihiro Takahashi, Megumu Fukunaga, Katufumi Mizushige, Shoichi Senda, Haruhiko Sakamoto, Hirohide Matsuo, Shigekazu Yuasa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most pathological evaluations using ordinary optical microscopy are usually qualitative and subjective. The beneficial properties of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) include not only observation of microstructure but also quantitative measurement of acoustic propagation speed, indicating the tissue elasticity. In this study, we examined the capability of SAM to evaluate pathological findings in glomeruli using anti-Thy.1 glomerulonephritis. Light microscopic observations of the glomeruli showed severe cell proliferation and mesangial matrix expansion at 10 days after induction of glomerulonephritis and, yet, to a lower extent at day 21 with onset of healing. C-mode scanning of SAM enabled imaging of glomerular structure compatible to findings of ordinary light microscopy. In addition, glomerular propagation speed in nephritic rats was significantly increased at day 10, and then decreased at day 21. These results indicate that SAM evaluation may be a new, useful technique for quantitative evaluation of proliferative glomerular lesions. (C) 2000 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-577
Number of pages7
JournalUltrasound in Medicine and Biology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 May 1

Keywords

  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Scanning acoustic microscopy
  • Tissue elasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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