A look into the acquisition of English motion event conflation by native speakers of Chinese and Japanese

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Since Talmy (2000 a&b) introduced his linguistic typology based on event conflation, it has been the source of much debate and ongoing research. One area that can particularly benefit from such research is the field of Second Language Acquisition. Cadierno (2008), Inagaki (2002) and many others have attempted to unveil the differences and difficulties that occur when learning a second language that is of a different type than one's native language. However, the current research in this area has thus far only dealt with satellite-framed and verb-framed languages. According to Slobin (2004), Chen and Guo (2008) and others, languages such as Chinese can be considered to be of a third type, known as equipollently-framed languages. This paper presents research that has attempted to observe the differences and similarities in the acquisition of a satellite-framed language (English) by native speakers of a verb-framed language (Japanese) and an equipollentlyframed language (Chinese).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPACLIC 24 - Proceedings of the 24th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation
Pages563-572
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec 1
Event24th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation, PACLIC 24 - Sendai, Japan
Duration: 2010 Nov 42010 Nov 7

Publication series

NamePACLIC 24 - Proceedings of the 24th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

Other

Other24th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation, PACLIC 24
CountryJapan
CitySendai
Period10/11/410/11/7

Keywords

  • Cognitive linguistics
  • Equipollently-framed language
  • Event conflation
  • Motion events
  • Second language acquisition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)

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