A lipoteichoic acid fraction of Enterococcus hirae activates cultured human monocytic cells via a CD14-independent pathway to promote cytokine production, and the activity is inhibited by serum components

Rieko Arakaki, Shunji Sugawara, Hideki Nakashima, Shozo Kotani, Haruhiko Takada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To elucidate the cellular activation mechanisms of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) compared with those of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a quantitatively major LTA fraction, QM-1M, was prepared from hot phenol-water extracts of Enterococcus hirae (ATCC 9790) by hydrophobic octyl-Sepharose chromatography and by ion-exchange membrane (QMA-Mem Sep 1010) chromatography as a 60% 1-propanol- and 1 M NaCl-eluted fraction. Unlike the reference Escherichia coli LPS, QM-1M did not demonstrate any ability to induce cytokines in a human whole blood culture system in this study, whereas QM-1M induced a few cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α in human monocytic THP-1 cell and human peripheral mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures in the absence of serum. Fetal calf and human sera decreased the above cytokine induction by QM-1M in THP-1 and PBMC cultures, whereas sera increased activities of the reference LPS. IL-8 induction in the absence of serum in response to QM-1M was demonstrated to proceed through a CD14-independent pathway unlike the reference LPS. Copyright (C) 1998 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-291
Number of pages9
JournalFEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998 Dec 1

Keywords

  • CD14
  • Enterococcus hirae
  • Interleukin-8
  • Lipoteichoic acid
  • Monocyte
  • Tumor necrosis factor-α

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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