A kinetic study of organic compounds (acetone, toluene, n-hexane and n-decane) adsorption behavior on activated carbon under supercritical carbon dioxide conditions at temperature from 313 to 353 K and at pressure from 4.2 to 15.0 MPa

Ikuo Ushiki, Masaki Ota, Yoshiyuki Sato, Hiroshi Inomata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adsorption kinetics of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (acetone, toluene, n-hexane and n-decane) on activated carbon under supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) conditions was studied. Breakthrough curve measurements of VOCs in scCO2 were performed with a fixed bed method for activated carbon (ca. mean particles diameter: 100 μm, specific surface area: 1300 m2/g and mean pore diameter: 0.687 nm, respectively). The measured breakthrough curves could be correlated with a kinetic model by using only one fitting parameter (effective diffusion coefficient in pore) within 10% of average relative deviation. The determined effective diffusion coefficient decreased with decreasing temperatures and increasing pressures at all conditions. Additionally, a generalized model of the determined effective diffusion coefficients was developed, and the proposed model could satisfactorily describe temperature and pressure dependence at all VOCs conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-194
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Supercritical Fluids
Volume95
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Nov

Keywords

  • Activated carbon
  • Adsorption kinetics
  • Breakthrough curve
  • Carbon dioxide
  • Effective diffusion coefficient
  • Supercritical fluid
  • Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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