A hypothesis that explains the human postural control characteristics

Makoto Yoshizawa, Hiroshi Takeda, Masahiro Ozawa, Yoshio Sasaki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the role of the visual feedback information in the frequency domain, the frequency component included in the visual feedback information has been filtered and the effect of the filtered information on the human body sway during quiet standing has been analyzed. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the test subject's postural control characteristics and to estimate the different roles of the visual information used for postural stability in the low and the high frequency domains. It is concluded that the hypothesis based on the spatial map in the brain is useful to explain the role of the visual feedback information in the frequency domain.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages2005-2006
Number of pages2
Editionpt 5
ISBN (Print)0780302168
Publication statusPublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 13th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - Orlando, FL, USA
Duration: 1991 Oct 311991 Nov 3

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology
Numberpt 5
Volume13
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

OtherProceedings of the 13th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
CityOrlando, FL, USA
Period91/10/3191/11/3

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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  • Cite this

    Yoshizawa, M., Takeda, H., Ozawa, M., & Sasaki, Y. (1991). A hypothesis that explains the human postural control characteristics. In Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology (pt 5 ed., pp. 2005-2006). (Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology; Vol. 13, No. pt 5). Publ by IEEE.