A gradual change between methanogenesis and sulfidogenesis during a long-term UASB treatment of sulfate-rich chemical wastewater

Jiang Wu, Qigui Niu, Lu Li, Yong Hu, Chaimaa Mribet, Toshimasa Hojo, Yu You Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The competition between methane-producing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria is an important topic in anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this study, an Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor (UASB) was operated for 330 days to evaluate the treatment performance of sulfate-rich wastewater. The effects of competition change between methane production and sulfate reduction on the organic removal efficiency, methane production, and electrons allocation were investigated. Synthetic wastewater was composed of ethanol and acetate with a chemical oxygen demand (COD)/SO 4 2− of 1.0. As a result, the COD removal efficiency achieved in long-term treatment was higher than 90%. During the initial stage, methane production was the dominant reaction. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) could only partially oxidize ethanol to acetate, and methane-producing archaea (MPA) utilized acetate for methane production. Methane production declined gradually over the long-term operation, whereas the sulfate-reducing efficiency increased. However, UASB performed well throughout the experiment because there was no significant inhibition. After the complete reduction of the sulfate, MPA converted the remaining COD into methane.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-176
Number of pages9
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume636
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Sep 15

Keywords

  • Complete oxidizing SRB
  • Electron flow
  • Long-term competition
  • Methanogenesis
  • UASB

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

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