A controlled-release capsule device for transscleral drug delivery to the retina

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We report the design and testing of a transscleral drug delivery system that is implantable in the episclera and allows for controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or other protein-type drugs with zero-order kinetics. The microfabricated capsule consists of a drug reservoir sealed with a controlled-release membrane that contains interconnected collagen microparticles (COLs), which are the routes for drug permeation. The drug kinetics can be controlled by changing the drug formulation and/or the membrane COL density so that the size of the bursts is reduced, which extends the release period. When capsules were sutured onto sclerae of rabbit eyes, a drug mimic was found to spread to the retinal pigment epithelium. Implantation of the device was easy, and it did not damage the eye tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages452-454
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)9780979806452
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1
Event16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012 - Okinawa, Japan
Duration: 2012 Oct 282012 Nov 1

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012

Other

Other16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2012
CountryJapan
CityOkinawa
Period12/10/2812/11/1

Keywords

  • Controlled release
  • Drug delivery system
  • Retinal neuroprotection
  • Transscleral delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering

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