A case of potassium-sensitive periodic paralysis with cardiac dysrhythmia controlled with imipramine and acetazolamide

Toshiki Endo, Atsushi Takecla, Yusei Shiga, Jyuichi Fujimori, Toshiaki Takahashi, Maki Tateyama, Hiroshi Onodera, Yasuto Itoyama, Takashi Yoshimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We report a patient with potassium-sensitive periodic paralysis with cardiac dysrhythmia. The patient was a 16-year-old man. He presented with asymptomatic ventricular dysrhythmia and periodic paralysis when he was 6 and 12 years old, respectively. Physical examination revealed slight dysmorphic features such as hypoplastic mandible, low-set ears and clinodac-tyly. Through an exercise test, a potassium tolerance test and a muscle biopsy, his illness was diagnosed as potassium-sensitive periodic paralysis with cardiac dysrhythmia. For the treatment of his episodic paralysis, we started acetazolamide, which improved both the incidence and the severity of paralysis. However, the incidence of cardiac dysrhythmia was increased after the use of acetazolamide. Routine anti-arrhythmic drugs such as lidocaine failed to control his ventricular dysrhythmia. Only imipramine showed its efficacy by improving the degree and the incidence of cardiac dysrhythmia without aggravating periodic paralysis. This syndrome is relatively rare and there have been no standard protocols for the treatment. We propose the combination of acetazolamide and imipramine as the first choice for this clinical entity. We also discussed the efficacy of the exercise test. It enabled us to confirm the diagnosis of periodic paralysis safely and easily by recording the change of compound muscle action potential amplitudes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-376
Number of pages4
JournalBrain and Nerve
Volume53
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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