99. Dissociated role of left hemisphere on word retrieval: dissociation between confrontation naming and verbal fluency tests in mild aphasics

K. Suzuki, K. Endo, L. Ohtake, I. Ishizaka, K. Hosokawa, N. Shibuya, T. Fujii, A. Yamadori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Words can be retrieved by a few different ways and localized lesions could affect a part of the neural network for retrieving words. We examined ability to name pictures and to generate many words according nine semantic and three phonemic cues (category and letter fluency) in 20 mild aphasics with frontal and nonfrontal lesions. Ten aphasics with left frontal lesions matched 10 aphasics with posterior lesions for results of confrontation naming and age. Naming ability of 10 different categories was not significantly different between two groups. In contrast, performance on category and letter fluency was significantly worse in the frontal group than that of the nonfrontal group. The left frontal lobe is especially important in retrieving words with self-generated strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-358
Number of pages3
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume47
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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